Archive for the ‘ART BOOKS’ Category

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ART BOOKS

October 10, 2010

I received a number of books in the mail this week from a big Amazon order. I’m quite the sucker for art technique books (especially older ones) although I feel there’s only so much you can learn from them.

First up is Burne Hogarth’s DYNAMIC WRINKLES AND DRAPERY. I don’t think drapery is as difficult to understand as flesh and bone, but it certainly can be problematic. I’ve only read the first few pages and suspect a few Hogath’s tricks can go a long way in rendering the wrinkles of cloth.

I’ve wanted to learn more about the Neoclassical sculptor Antonio Canova and, unfortunately, THE WORKS OF ANTONIO CANOVA probably won’t fill me it. It appears to contain very basic descriptions of his work and nothing more. If anyone knows of a good Canova biography out there, please direct me to it.

Also picked up 50 ROBOTS TO DRAW AND PAINT. Again, I haven’t read it yet, but in flipping through it, I’m liking the overall information about how to render robots both digitally and traditionally more than the specific designs of the robots they are presenting. I’m kind of a snob when it comes to robot aesthetics and have much to say on the subject.

Finally, I received THE INVENTION OF HUGO CABRET, the 2008 winner of the Caldecott Award for best picture book. I’m blown away by how ambitious and innovative a project it is. I am a big fan of Selznick’s illustrations in THE DINOSAURS OF WATERHOUSE HAWKINGS but feel “Hugo Cabret” surpasses them. I find it very inspirational to see an artist pour so much into his or her work. You can real feel the passion that Selznick has for the subject matter. I’m hardly surprised to learn that Martin Scorsese is turning it into an upcoming film.

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ART INSTRUCTION

October 10, 2010

I’m a big fan of the books of George Bridgman and love the way he’s able to describe the volumes of the human form so simply. I guess that he’s drawn the parts of the human body so often that he occasionally would zone out while doing so. A big no-prize for the first person to comment on what’s wrong with this drawing.
Leg Drawing

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PERSPECTIVE FOR GENIUSES

October 4, 2010

My favorite book on the subject, by far, is Perspective For Artists by Rex Vicat Cole. I’m no stranger to drawing objects receding in space, but the book goes into such detail about how to plot points for all kinds of different perspective issues (Perspective of clouds, perspective of inclines, perspective of battlements that have cappings continuous with their outline, etc) that I found myself having to really focus to keep up (a good thing.) Perhaps the most complex concepts arise in the section discussing the perspective of shadows. The delightful (and oftentimes humorous) writing style of Mr. Cole presents the numerous steps required to diagram out accurate perspective as if the process is simple and that we all already know what a “psuedo sun” is.


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