Archive for October, 2010

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BOY-BOT & BOY

October 17, 2010

Here’s a completely-hand-drawn panel for BOY-BOT & BOY (as opposed to a drawing in which I start by tracing a screengrab of an environment constructed in Maya.) I’m excited to get a bunch of panels done and then place them all on one canvas and lay out a full page.
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Again, my idea is to make this a wordless picture book so I’m focussing trying to tell the story visually. All I’m trying to get across here that the mom wants her son to play outside because it’s such a beautiful day. I believe this is something that kids can relate to, especially the kids of today. Perhaps having a deer in their yard is overkill, but it’s my hope that it comes across as humorous.

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A DINOSAUR CHRISTMAS

October 10, 2010

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Above is a two page spread for a project I’ve been working on for a while called “A Dinosaur Christmas.”

The idea for this part of the story is that Santa and the reindeer are trapped in the Cretaceous Era and get the dinosaurs excited about the Christmas spirit.

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ART WALK

October 10, 2010

Went to the BREWERY ART WALK yesterday with my daughter. I didn’t know what to expect, but it certainly wasn’t something that massive. It just seemed like there was building after building filled with studios and galleries – and in a place where you wouldn’t expect it. I was happy to see that the event was heavily attended and noticed a high volume of Japanese tourists – nice to see them putting a favorable exchange rate to good use.

There was simply so much to see that my daughter got tired well before we checked everything out (and we checked a lot out). As we were heading to the car and she was dragging her feet, we decided to peek behind a curtain and check out one last gallery. It was filled with beautiful animal sculptures made out of wire and lights. Suddenly, my daughter was no longer tired and inisted on drawing all of the animal sculptures in my sketchbook!


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ART BOOKS

October 10, 2010

I received a number of books in the mail this week from a big Amazon order. I’m quite the sucker for art technique books (especially older ones) although I feel there’s only so much you can learn from them.

First up is Burne Hogarth’s DYNAMIC WRINKLES AND DRAPERY. I don’t think drapery is as difficult to understand as flesh and bone, but it certainly can be problematic. I’ve only read the first few pages and suspect a few Hogath’s tricks can go a long way in rendering the wrinkles of cloth.

I’ve wanted to learn more about the Neoclassical sculptor Antonio Canova and, unfortunately, THE WORKS OF ANTONIO CANOVA probably won’t fill me it. It appears to contain very basic descriptions of his work and nothing more. If anyone knows of a good Canova biography out there, please direct me to it.

Also picked up 50 ROBOTS TO DRAW AND PAINT. Again, I haven’t read it yet, but in flipping through it, I’m liking the overall information about how to render robots both digitally and traditionally more than the specific designs of the robots they are presenting. I’m kind of a snob when it comes to robot aesthetics and have much to say on the subject.

Finally, I received THE INVENTION OF HUGO CABRET, the 2008 winner of the Caldecott Award for best picture book. I’m blown away by how ambitious and innovative a project it is. I am a big fan of Selznick’s illustrations in THE DINOSAURS OF WATERHOUSE HAWKINGS but feel “Hugo Cabret” surpasses them. I find it very inspirational to see an artist pour so much into his or her work. You can real feel the passion that Selznick has for the subject matter. I’m hardly surprised to learn that Martin Scorsese is turning it into an upcoming film.

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COMIC BOOKS

October 10, 2010

Was reading some old issues of the WEST COAST AVENGERS from the John Byrne run and, in the middle of this wonderfully complex multi-issue story, came across a page of which I’m quite fond.

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While I’m impressed with Byrne’s pure drawing ability, what gets me here is the sense of motion in the panels. One can almost hear Iron Man’s “suit seals” activating as we see the eye panels closing up in the center panel. The sense of motion and depth in the following panel as Iron Man dives into the ocean as the US Agent swims to shore is very strong despite very limited detail. I also like the feeling of scale of the Mole Man’s monster at the top by the way the panel is cropped. There are probably lots of comic book panels out there just as good as this one, but I was really struck by it as I read the issue.

Even more fun was how the whole storyline ended. One thing that comic books (especially Marvel Comic books) do well is get away with heroic speeches at the end of issues. With the exception of the Silver Surfer, no character in the Marvel universe is as well suited to make a big speech as Thor. Although it’s probably overdone, I still really like it. And I’m always a sucker for an asterisk that references issues that are ancient history*
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*like the asterisk at the end of the Kree Skrull War in Avengers 89-97 which references Fantastic Four #2!

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ART INSTRUCTION

October 10, 2010

I’m a big fan of the books of George Bridgman and love the way he’s able to describe the volumes of the human form so simply. I guess that he’s drawn the parts of the human body so often that he occasionally would zone out while doing so. A big no-prize for the first person to comment on what’s wrong with this drawing.
Leg Drawing

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ROBOTS

October 10, 2010

My new project, “BOY-BOT & BOY” will images of many robots as well as toy robots. It’s made me go back and look at a lot of different robot drawings and photos for reference. Here’s one that I’m quite fond of: a drawing of an unmade toy from the “Machine Robo” line in Japan, which I believe is simply called “Animal Robo.” There are lots of combining (“gattai” in Japanese) robots out there, but this one has to be at the top of the list in terms of the number of (animal) robots that come together to form this guy. Despite the sheer number of parts that make up the whole here, I still find the combined form to be quite harmonious. It’s a shame to me that it never became an actual toy.
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